June 29, 2021 3 min read

OK ladies, we’ve heard you loud and clear...

Period cramps suck!

And as much as you’ve tried to look for alternative relief, it seems you’re left to suffer from painful period cramps all on your own. Doctors, over-the-counter (OTC) medications, and hormone drugs never seem to cut it.

We know it’s likely you’ve stumbled upon several articles promising home remedies and supplements that address pretty severe menstrual cramps. But that’s not the purpose of this article.

We’re simply here to inform women what menstrual cramps are and how CBD works in the female body.

 

Understanding menstrual cramps

Menstruation, most commonly known as your “period”, is when a woman bleeds a certain time each month.

In other words, the female uterus will discard monthly buildup through the cervix and out of their vagina to help prepare their body for pregnancy [¹].

It’s a pretty amazing biological process, right?

But it’s also during this process that these hormone-like compounds, or prostaglandins, are released in the uterus to help it shed its monthly buildup.

While prostaglandins are necessary for healthy menstruation, sometimes too many of them are released, causing those severe, long-lasting period cramps. You know the kind, where you’re buckled over in the fetal position for hours on end. And the kind that stick around for more than a few days.

Unfortunately, the cause of excess prostaglandins is unclear. Doctors believe it is the result of another underlying root cause, such as Endometriosis, PCOS, or other female hormonal imbalances or health issues.

What’s more, stress is a contributor to inflammation, which scientists believe is the main cause of most, if not all, health problems and diseases.

And when it comes to menstrual cramps, the body is clearly under a lot of stress due to severe pain, bloating, and other unwanted symptoms.

So… 

How do you get rid of menstrual cramps?

As we mentioned early, menstrual cramps that last no more than three to four days are a normal part of the menstruation process.

But having severe menstrual cramps that last several days or even weeks, is alarming.

Sure, OTC medications can help in the short term, but studies show that certain medications can actually cause more harm in your body in the long run [²].

The best and safest options to reduce menstrual cramps is by eating a healthy, anti-inflammatory diet, staying hydrated, reducing your caffeine intake, getting enough sleep, exercising regularly, and mindfully reducing stressors in your life.

Now how does CBD fit into all of this?

 

CBD for menstrual cramps

According to research, CBD is known to interact with our Endocannabinoid System in a way that helps reintroduce balance throughout the body [³].

Scientists are still doing their best to understand how CBD actually works in the human body, but what they’ve noticed is that some people with endocannabinoid deficiencies find support in their overall health when consuming cannabinoid-based supplements, like CBD oil or CBD gummies [].

And since the ECS is responsible for regulating our mood, digestion, perception of pain, reproductive health, etc., it’s not a wonder that many women around the world have found success with CBD while on their period.

Still, it’s important to understand that CBD is not a “cure all”. While it holds tremendous therapeutic properties, it’s imperative to steer clear from companies that promise period pain relief.

In the end, if you really want to know if CBD can help relieve your period pain, then it’s best to tryhigh quality CBD products for yourself.

That said, CBD gummies are great if you're looking for something that isn’t bitter-tasting or hard to dose.

CBD oil is great if you’re only interested in purity and versatility; you can use CBD oil in smoothies, baked goods, or other recipes.

And CBD topicals are great to use for aches and pains.

For more information on where to find high quality and effective CBD products, reach out to our Leaf Remedy’s team, or check out more of our website.

Sources:

  1. Menstrual Cycle
  2. Midol side effects
  3. The Endocannabinoid System
  4. Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency